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Mozambique

Hi all – I’ve come up for air and let me tell why I’ve been shedding.

The other day while perusing the music store for a new pair of hi hat cymbals a drummer friend showed me this groove called the “Mozambique” (see exercise 2 below). I wrote the pattern down and went home to practice it. Well this just feels so good to play and flat out grooves that it inspired me to learn more about the “Mozambique”. Check out the links on this page to start your own journey. Very cool!

Now on to the lesson.

In this first exercise we see the basic ride pattern on the top line and the alternating foot pattern between bass drum and hi hat on the bottom line. Start slow and as always use a metronome. Keep thing line up and play this exercise until it become natural. Natural, meaning your not thinking about it. Now this feels pretty good but it seems to just lie there. Take a look at exercise two.


EXERCISE 1

In exercise two we are going to add the floor and mount toms (above and below the middle staff line) and accents to the ride pattern. Again, keep thing line up and play this exercise until it become natural. Work towards keeping all unaccented notes soft and of equal volume and intensity. To help further your independence development you can count out loud. Now this is begging to sound and feel really good.
But wait there is more! Take a look at exercise three.


EXERCISE 2

Now in exercise three, let’s spice it up a bit and use the bell of the cymbal for the accents. Remember to work towards keeping all unaccented notes soft and of equal volume and intensity. If we really want to get something going here we can set up a cow bell next to the hi hat and use the opposite hand to play the ride pattern between these two instruments while our regular ride hand plays the toms. Oh this is becoming a real bony groove now.


EXERCISE 3

In exercise four we play a 3/2 clave against the ride pattern.


EXERCISE 4

Okay this is getting crazy and I think you get the idea.

Until next time – Keep grooving!

 
 

© Copyright 2009 - 2011 by Mark Pryor